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Heritage Recording Services


In the beginning there is the object, not particular systems, software or people. The task is to gather as much information about the object as possible, paying particular attention to he specific requirements of the client but not omitting anything that might be found to be valuable at a later date if it can be collected efficiently.

The methods we use range from the traditional steel tape and hand sketch to state-of-the-art total station surveying and laser distance measuring equipment. However the main resource we bring to the exercise is a long experience recording architectural and other heritage monuments and an in-depth understanding of the requirements of the discipline.

The product we provide is typically completely digital and is based database tables detailing all measurements as well as any other characteristics of the objects in question. These tables are designed to contain the original record in an easily (and universally) accessible format and to be expandable to accommodate any and all other data, previous or future, that can be rendered into digital formats (and pointers to the items that can't).

By-products of the above which we will supply along with the geometric record include:

For Autocad users we also supply software to facilitate the query of these objects to access the supporting data types.

We are able to provide these products in a timely and cost effective manner by using the CART suite of hardware, software and methodology which allows us to collect up to a thousand survey points a day, the automatic creation of the CAD model while still on site. We bring to the site a complete array of tools including:

Some additional reading available on this site further explaining our approach and showing the results of some projects include:

Our price per day may seem high at first glance but no client has yet complained about the price of the product or the time it takes to get the results.

Send email to: steve@icomos.org to discuss your project.


Last change: February 3, 1998 (Steve Nickerson) steve@icomos.org